Technology

The Design and Technology Department aims to create an environment that will support the academic and personal development of each student.  This is achieved through the continual development and delivery of an exciting curriculum that enables all students to achieve their potential.  We also have good links with the community and industry including Surrey SATRO, Sainsbury’s, FutureChef Programme, The Design Council etc.

A number of competitions take place annually; we use industrialists as much as possible to demonstrate and enhance the lessons; we also run a number of trips involving various aspects of technology.

Our overall focus is that every child matters and we aim to:

  • Stimulate student interest, enjoyment, curiosity and concern about technological aspects of their environment.
  • Enable students to be familiar with the relevant knowledge, skills, principles and vocabulary,and become confident in:
    • Designing, and producing a range of technological products 'of good quality';
    • Evaluating and improving upon their own technological products and those designed by others.
  •     Enable students to perceive Design and Technology as:
    • a major cultural feature;
    • part of a wider body of knowledge and skills, e.g. to be able to work both independently and co-operatively.
  • Employ teaching methods and resources that allow all students (irrespective of their gender, ethnic origin, academic ability, etc.) to have equal access to Design and Technology and to experience success and enjoyment in their work.
  • Develop awareness in students of:
    • the implications of Design and Technology (past and present) for the individual and the local, national and international communities. Students should understand the role of Design and Technology as a critical factor in human, social, economic, cultural and environmental well-being and development.
    • the significance of Design and Technology and to value its importance in society.
    • the effects that technology has on human society and the environment; hence developing an awareness of technical, aesthetic, moral, economic, social, cultural, and environmental considerations that can make conflicting demands on designers and manufacturers.
  • Enable pupils to develop a range of personal qualities such as safety awareness, politeness, perseverance, concern for others, initiative and independence.
  • Faciliate the collaberative work of STEM subjects (Science, Technology, engineering and Maths) to enhance the learning and introduce students to the latest cutting-edge technologies.


School Trips

A number of school visits are arranged throughout the course of the year.  Details of trips which have taken place this year or are planned in the future can be viewed in the School Visits, Enrichment area of the website.

Facilities

The Curriculum area is housed in well-equipped and well-maintained facilities consisting of two workshops, one plastics’ workshop / graphics room and a further graphics’ room, two food technology rooms and two textiles’ rooms, one computer pod housing ten computers. CAM is a major focus and the department make good use of a laser cutter, six CAD/CAM sewing machines. The department is also equipped with an industry standard laser cutter that allows students to create complex designs in a variety of materials.

Useful Links

KS3 Food Preparation and Nutrition

Years 7, 8, 9

All Key Stage Three students study the areas of graphics, resistant materials (including plastics), food and textiles. All projects follow the design process and culminate in the students making one of their designs. Our focus in KS3 is to develop practical skills which provide students with a better understanding of materials and processes when embarking on their designs. They are introduced to a range of design and making skills and are encouraged to critically evaluate their work and that of others.

Year 7

Students complete a basic skills course focusing on safety and hygiene, food choices in relation to healthy eating, two 'design and make' tasks focusing on a milk based drink or a smoothie and the 1 Star chef award to make a batch of muffins including fruit and vegetables.  Practical skills are delivered through the preparation of a range of dishes and using a range of equipment.

Year 8

Students do not study food technology during curriculum time but Year 8 students are encouraged and invited to join and attend our Futurechef cooking club after school.

Year 9

Students opt to study Food Technology for half a year to extend their basic skills from Year 7 and to get a taster for the GCSE Food Technology course or the NCFE Food and Cookery course.  Students follow a heavy practical skills based course to give them essential life skills post 16 and develop more complex skills to further their knowledge and skills of equipment and cooking techniques. 

They follow a baking module at the start focusing on cakes, biscuits and pastry skills using a variety of equipment and ingredients.  They continue with a module based on salads and main meals in preparation for the 2 Star Chef award an independent practical skills assessment where they complete a design and make task to produce a healthy pizza or calzone to share with their friends. The final module focuses on main meals such as stir fry, curry, pasta dishes and Shepherds Pie culminating in the 3 Star Chef award their final design and make assessed practical task where they have to create at least two healthy dishes to be served at a celebration event or festival to reduce the fat, sugar and salt levels.

What skills students develop

Weighing and measuring, using equipment safely and hygienically, cooking a range of snacks, main meals, desserts, using a range of different ingredients and methods of cooking.

How students are assessed

Assessment takes place throughout all of the Key Stage 3 Food Technology projects and work is not marked exclusively at the end. Folders or books are expected to be kept organised and well presented at all times and these essential areas can affect the overall final level. The student’s level will also be based on; their ability to meet the requirements of a brief, their testing and trialling of recipes and skills and their final practical outcomes. By the end of Key Stage 3 this will include the 1 Star Chef award in  Year 7 and in Year 9 a series of practical activities and the 2 Star and 3 Star chef awards.

Homework

A variety of homework tasks are set throughout the projects. On occasions these will be based on activities from the lesson to evaluate their products or dishes, or they may be an independent research task related to the course content or Chef Awards. If practical skills can be practised at home we thoroughly encourage it but we understand this is not always feasible.

How parents can help

All parents can help students with their Food Technology work by providing basic ingredients and equipment that will allow them to present all of their work to a high standard and folders in which to store their work. Another way in which a parent can support their child is by showing an interest in the subject and asking them what they have recently been cooking during their Food Technology lessons. Ideally a parent will check over homework items and support them with their literacy skills.  I would encourage parents to support students by allowing them to weigh their own ingredients and prepare their equipment for practical lessons themselves so that they familiarise themselves with scales and ingredients and are prepared for the lesson.

Extra-curricular Activities

A variety of after school activities regularly take place that help enthuse and support students who have an interest in Food Technology and cooking whether they are currently studying it or not. After school sessions are held on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday and could be an extension of class based learning, an opportunity to complete homework or current coursework project.  On Wednesday our dedicated after school cooking club (FutureChef Club) takes place where students attend voluntarily to cook a range of seasonal dishes, compete in cooking competitions and generally enjoy cooking and trying out and testing new recipes.

Useful Food Technology Links

KS3 Graphics

Years 7, 8, 9

All Key Stage Three students study the areas of graphics, resistant materials (including plastics), food and textiles. All projects follow the design process and culminate in the students making one of their designs. Our focus in KS3 is to develop practical skills which provide students with a better understanding of materials and processes when embarking on their designs. They are introduced to a range of design and making skills and are encouraged to critically evaluate their work and that of others.

Year 7 Graphics

In year 7, students study the fundamentals of graphics. They explore the use of CAD/CAM, logo designing, drawing techniques, using Adobe Illustrator and 2D Design to produce commercially viable and professional products.

Students design their own corporate identity/logo for a new activity pack to keep young children entertained on long journeys. This is an exciting project which helps to develop their visual graphic skills, making skills and ICT skills. Students understand packaging design and become familiar with symbols such Barcodes, QR codes, Recycling and BSI.

Year 8 Graphics

Year 8 students complete an Interior Design Project, which covers all the main elements of interior design. The students will conduct research into existing design styles, scale, technical drawing, colour schemes and room layout. They then choose the contents of the room based on fixtures, fittings and furniture found online and in catalogues. Students are then given an imaginary budget to which they must keep. The practical elements of the project include creating the structure of a scaled down room, using computer programmes to print items to the correct scale, creating the chosen room items using a variety of materials such as card, plastic, woods, paper and fabric. Students learn about awareness of space and how interior designing works in the real world.

What skills students develop

Hand skills, computer skills, accuracy, dimensioning, scale, presentation, manipulating images, colour awareness, promotion, packaging, nets, working with a variety of materials, sustainable design, meeting a brief, designing for a target market, planning, calculating, researching.

How students are assessed

Assessment takes place throughout all of the Key Stage 3 Graphics projects and work is not marked exclusively at the end. Folders are expected to be kept organised and well presented at all times and these essential areas can affect the overall final level. The student’s level will also be based on; their ability to meet the requirements of a brief, their testing and trialling of materials and skills and their final practical outcome. By the end of Key Stage 3 this will include a piece of well finished jewellery and packaging in Year 7, a scale model of a bedroom that suits a teenagers needs in Year 8 and in Year 9 a container that can protect and will visually appeal to a chosen target market and a display board to help promote it.

Homework

A variety of homework tasks are set throughout the projects. On occasions these will be based on activities from the lesson, or they may be an independent research task. If practical elements can be practised at home we thoroughly encourage it but we understand this is not always feasible.

How parents can help

All parents can help students with their Technology work by providing basic equipment that will allow them to present all of their work to a high standard. Another way in which a parent can support their child is by showing an interest in the subject and asking them what they have recently been completing during their Technology lessons. Ideally a parent will check over homework items and support them with their literature skills.

Extra-curricular Activities

A variety of afterschool activities regularly take place that help enthuse and support students who have an interest in Graphics whether they are currently studying it or not. After school session are held on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday and could be an extension of class based learning, an opportunity to complete homework or a completely new project. On occasions we have even had the students come up with ideas for Graphics based projects which we are able to facilitate.
 

KS3 Resistant Materials

Years 7, 8, 9

All Key Stage Three students study the areas of graphics, resistant materials (including plastics), food and textiles. All projects follow the design process and culminate in the students making one of their designs. Our focus in KS3 is to develop practical skills which provide students with a better understanding of materials and processes when embarking on their designs. They are introduced to a range of design and making skills and are encouraged to critically evaluate their work and that of others.

Year 7

During Year 7, students carry out a variety of Resistant Materials based tasks within the Jewellery project.  At the beginning of the project they will research, design and create their own piece of pewter jewellery which complements a piece of packaging they have created. To enable the manufacture of their jewellery, students will design the aesthetics of the proposed idea, create a mould and cast the object themselves.

Year 8

During Year 8, students will complete a Clock Project. The primary focus is working with plastics and developing an understanding of the advantages and disadvantages of this material group. We will start to consider environmental impact, the responsibility of the designer and also fully explore the creative/manufacturing possibilities that plastics provide. To this end students will manufacture a range of small products before starting their clock, so that they have the necessary practical skills and knowledge to wholly embrace the opportunities this most versatile of materials offers.

To facilitate their practical work, students will start to learn basic design skills. They will consider various types of 3D drawing techniques, the use of tone and shade and they will learn about templates to improve the accuracy of their products.

Year 9

During Year 9, students will complete a Mechanical Toy.  Within this project it is hoped students will build upon the skills they have learnt in Year 7 and 8 when working with metal and plastic and acquire the necessary skills to work with a variety of wood. The long term goal is that students, who wish to study this subject at GCSE, are fully equipped with the knowledge and understanding, in all material areas, to give them the best chance of success. Regardless of whether a student continues with this subject at GCSE or not, all Year 9 students will develop skills, through their practical and folder work, which are of use across the curriculum.

In particular students will show independence by researching and presenting relevant information on a range of topics from types of wood to common joining methods. They will analyse their findings and incorporate key points in to the design process. Students will be selective in the choices they make and will thoroughly evaluate their designs to manufacture the most appropriate solution for the target market.

What skills students develop

A wide range of hand skills, computer skills, including CAD and layout, accuracy, dimensioning, presentation, manipulating images, colour awareness, promotion, advertising, working with a variety of materials, sustainable design, meeting a brief, designing for a target market, planning, calculating, researching, analysing, evaluating, group work, peer assessment and self-assessment.

How students are assessed

Assessment takes place throughout all of the Key Stage 3 Resistant Materials projects and work is not marked exclusively at the end.  Folders are expected to be kept organised and well presented at all times and the quality of this and students extended learning will affect the overall final level. The student’s level will also be based on; their ability to meet the requirements of a brief, their testing and trialling of materials and skills, their focus on practical tasks, folder work and their final practical outcome. By the end of Key Stage 3 this will include a piece of well finished jewellery and packaging in Year 7, an acrylic clock for a teenager in Year 8 and in Year 9 a mechanical toy that is fully functioning and appeals to the students choice of target market.

Homework

A variety of homework tasks are set throughout the projects. On occasions these will be based on activities from the lesson, or they may be an independent research task. If practical elements can be practised at home we thoroughly encourage it but we understand this is not always feasible.

How parents can help

All parents can help students with their Technology work by providing basic equipment that will allow them to present all of their work to a high standard. Another way in which a parent can support their child is by showing an interest in the subject and asking them what they have recently been completing during their Technology lessons. Ideally a parent will check over homework items and support them with their literature skills.

Extra-curricular Activities

A variety of after school activities regularly take place that help enthuse and support students who have an interest in Resistant Materials whether they are currently studying it or not. After school sessions are held on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday and could be an extension of class based learning, an opportunity to complete homework or a completely new project. On occasions we have even had the students come up with ideas for Resistant Materials based projects which we are able to facilitate.

KS3 Textiles

All Key Stage Three students study the areas of graphics, resistant materials (including plastics), food and textiles. All projects follow the design process and culminate in the students making one of their designs. Our focus in KS3 is to develop practical skills which provide students with a better understanding of materials and processes when embarking on their designs. They are introduced to a range of design and making skills and are encouraged to critically evaluate their work and that of others.

Years 7, 8, 9

Students develop an awareness and interest in the broad area of textiles. They are encouraged to explore and experiment with a wide range of techniques and equipment to develop skills and to express themselves creatively.

Year 7

Students learn basic skills, gathering a general knowledge of all equipment within the work room.  The project that student’s work on for one term,  is to design and make a patchwork cushion cover, which is decorated using sublimation printing and can be personalised individually via the use of components or CAD/CAM and reflect the theme of British Values.

Year 8

Students skills are developed further in Year 8 as they use more difficult fabrics to make a soft toy. This project extends their knowledge further and allows them to develop an understanding of the need for good research to help them plan, design and make their chosen toy safely, for a selected target market. It teaches them to construct a 3 dimensional product using shaping techniques.

Year 9

The Year 9 project extends student’s knowledge and skills even further in making a waistcoat inspired by the theme of natural forms. Lots of new and more difficult skills are introduced which students are expected to be able to focus on independently; the project allows for a high level of creativity and will prepare them for GCSE.

What skills students develop

Students will learn a range of skills from understanding the need of thorough research, to being able to gather ideas to assist with their design work and then be able to make informed choices for their final design. They will learn basic pattern cutting and assembly, as well as lots of decorative skills, using a variety of equipment and machinery – sewing machines, over lockers, CAD and CAM etc., to make a product. They will also then learn how to test and improve their product by evaluating thoroughly.

How students are assessed

Continuous assessment is maintained throughout each project including self-assessment as students reflect on their own work and how it can be improved, peer assessment giving constructive comments to their colleagues. All work is reviewed and marked by the teacher at regular intervals, students will have two tri-weekly and two key assessments over the term and their final projects are summatively assessed at the end of each term.

Homework

Homework is set regularly in line with a weekly timetable, which helps build on their knowledge gained in school thus enabling students to extend their capabilities and experience as they complete their project work.

How parents can help

· Parents can help students by monitoring their progress and evaluating their work with them.

· Help students with their textiles work by providing basic equipment that will allow them to present all of their work to a high standard.

· Another way in which a parent can support their child is by showing an interest in the subject and asking them what they have recently been completing during their textiles lessons.

· Ideally a parent will check over homework items and support them with their literature skills.

· On occasions a materials payment may be required and sometimes materials may need to be sourced independently.

· If practical elements can be practised at home we thoroughly encourage it.

Extra-curricular Activities

· In Textiles there is an after school club that runs regularly on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday evenings for all students that want to either continue with their coursework or maybe try some further skills or project.

· Various clubs or workshops are planned throughout the year – In November there is a Christmas decoration making workshop offered to years 8,9 and 10 with a small charge for materials.

KS4 Food Preparation and Nutrition

Year 10 and Year 11

At Key Stage Four, students study one of the four options. A high standard of work is encouraged throughout the department and every opportunity is offered for students to continue work after school to develop the more advanced skills. It is a busy department and students are highly motivated to join extracurricular activities. To date the department has achieved some excellent results.

Board and Exam Details

We currently follow the AQA examinations board in Food and Resistant Materials and Edexcel for Graphics and Textiles. All course have a 60% coursework / 40 % written exam paper element at the end of Year 11.

NCFE Food and Cookery - Year 10/11, Four Units of Work

Unit 01 - Preparing to Cook

This unit aims to introduce learners to the safe and hygienic preparation of the cooking environment and ingredients. Learners will understand the importance of how to prepare and store equipment and utensils. Learners will learn to understand and follow recipes to demonstrate their cooking skills to produce a variety of dishes.

Unit 02 - Understanding food

This unit aims to provide learners with an understanding of food sources and the factors that can affect food choices. Learners will be able to apply these factors when selecting and cooking dishes.

Unit 03 - Exploring balanced diets

Learners will understand the individual requirements of a balanced diet. They will learn about reference index (RI)/guideline daily amounts (GDAs) and how food labels can inform healthy eating. Learners will understand how to change recipes to make them healthier.

Unit 04 - Plan and produce dishes to a brief.

This unit will give learners the opportunity to bring together their learning and skills developed throughout the course to produce a menu in response to a brief. Learners will plan, make and review their completed dishes.

GCSE Food Technology AQA

A variety of practical cooking skills using a vast selection of ingredients and equipment.

  • GCSE - In Year 10 a series of modules to cover the syllabus requirements including Key Skills, Special Occasions, Salt and Health and Delicious Desserts.
  • GCSE - In Year 11 one project to research, design, produce and evaluate a chosen context given by the exam board.
  • What skills students develop
  • Food Technology is a practical subject which uses key cooking skills, knowledge of nutrition, ingredients, and understanding in developing new recipe ideas, planning using HACCP procedures, cooking recipes using higher level practical skills and finishing techniques, and evaluating the product, method of manufacture and individual performance.

Link to course specification

How students are assessed

  • Verbal feedback
  • Continuous assessment of class and homework
  • Self-assessment, peer assessment and evaluation
  • Tests and examinations
  • Controlled Assessment Coursework

Homework

A variety of homework tasks are set throughout the Food Technology courses.  Homework may relate to the theoretical elements of Food Technology which will prepare students for their examinations. It may consist of controlled assessment preparation. All set pieces of Food Technology coursework must be completed on time and to a high standard. Most controlled assessment coursework will be completed during lessons or under supervision at the end of the school day but additional work at home will enhance the overall grade and quality of work produced.

How parents can help

All parents can help students with their Food Technology work by providing ingredients and equipment that will allow them to present and cook all of their work to a high standard. Another way in which a parent can support their child is by showing an interest in the subject and asking them what they have recently been completing during their Food Technology lessons. Ideally a parent will check over homework items and support them with their literacy skills. 

If practical skills and recipes can be practised at home we thoroughly encourage it but we understand this is not always feasible.  I would encourage parents to support students by allowing them to weigh their own ingredients and prepare their own equipment for practical lessons themselves so that they familiarise themselves with scales and ingredients and are prepared for their lesson.  I would also encourage students to cook dinner at least once a week to practise their cooking skills, organisation and timing.

Extra-curricular Activities

A variety of after school activities regularly take place that help enthuse and support students who have an interest in Food Technology. After school sessions are held on Tuesdays and Thursdays and could be an extension of class based learning, an opportunity to complete homework or a current coursework project. The controlled assessment part of the course equates to 60% of the GCSE which means students will be required to attend after school sessions to enable them to prepare for their assessed pieces of work and practise possible recipe ideas in preparation for their assessed practical lessons.


Useful Links

KS4 Design Technology

Board and Exam Details

AQA Design Technology - One Route – All students study GCSE Design and Technology and at least one chosen specialist material area.

Folder – 35%

Practical – 15%

Examination – 50%

The Course

Students will complete in depth theoretical study and practical exploration of…..

  • Core technical principles
  • Specialist technical principles
  • Designing and making principles

What skills students develop

Hand skills, computer skills, accuracy, dimensioning, scale, presentation, working with a variety of materials, sustainable design, meeting a brief, designing for a target market, planning, calculating, researching, ability to apply own research and testing to their practical outcomes, presenting work to others, critically assess their own and their peers designs.  Parallel to theory and research students complete a substantial design and make task focusing on the key skills

  • Investigating
  • Designing
  • Making
  • Analysing and Evaluating

How students are assessed

  • Verbal feedback
  • Continuous assessment of class and homework
  • Self-assessment, peer assessment and evaluation
  • Tests and examinations
  • Non exam Assessment (NEA)

Homework

A variety of homework’s are set throughout the course.  Homework may relate to the theoretical elements of Design Technology which will prepare students for their examinations. It may consist of controlled assessment preparation. All set pieces of NEA must be completed on time and to a high standard. Most NEA will be completed during lessons or under supervision at the end of the school day.

How parents can help

All parents can help students with their Design Technology work by providing basic equipment that will allow them to present all of their work to a high standard.  Another way in which a parent can support their child is by showing an interest in the subject and asking them what they have recently been completing during their Technology lessons. Ideally a parent will check over homework items and support them with their literature skills.  On occasions a materials payment may be required and sometimes materials may need to be sourced independently. If practical elements can be practised at home we thoroughly encourage it but we understand this is not always feasible.

Extra-curricular Activities

A variety of after school activities regularly take place that help enthuse and support students who have an interest In Design Technology. After school session are held on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday and could be an extension of class based learning, an opportunity to complete homework or a completely new project.  The NEA section of the course equates to 50% of the GCSE which means students will be required to attend after school sessions to enable them to prepare for their assessed pieces of work.