Technology

Technology Curriculum Intent

The Design Technology Department at Blenheim High School is a hub of innovation and creative learning.

Our intent is;

  • To encourage learners to take risks and immerse themselves in all aspects of design.
  • To inspire, nurture and challenge students to reach their potential and beyond.
  • To employ teaching methods and resources that allow all students (irrespective of their gender, ethnic origin, academic ability, etc.) to have equal access to Design and Technology and to experience success and enjoyment in their work.
  • To educate students to recognise the implications and impact of Design and Technology (past and present) for the individual and the local, national and international communities. Students should understand the role of Design and Technology as a critical factor in human, social, economic, cultural and environmental well-being and development.
  • To promote pupils to develop a range of personal qualities such as safety awareness, politeness, perseverance, concern for others, initiative and independence.
  • To equip students with a foundation of core knowledge and skills for them to demonstrate their individuality and realise their ideas.
  • To offer students access to real world design scenarios and contexts that prepare them for the demands of the design world.
  • To enable all students to experience a sense of pride from creating an idea and developing it from concept to completion. 

Blenheim Design Technology offers students a wealth of opportunities and platforms to experience and specialise in the main areas of technology, whilst encouraging links between STEM subjects and the wider curriculum.

Blenheim Design Technology offers students:

  • Fully equipped Timber, Metal and Polymer workshops housing State of the art 3D printers, industry standard CNC laser cutting machinery complimented by traditional lathes, mills, a metal forge and welding bays.
  • Specialist Textiles workshops running Sublimation Printers, Computer aided design sewing machinery parallel with traditional textiles techniques and hand tools. 
  • Graphics studios blending drawing and digital software. 
  • Food preparation and cooking suites allowing children to work with professional chefs and catering experts.

The Design Technology department provides a broad and exciting curriculum, designed to strike a balance between rigour and inclusivity and academic and vocational based learning.

To capture and inspire  the minds of all learners the department provides access to the following courses and subject structure from KS3 to KS5.

Key Stage 3 

Year 7 – Students experience a different Design Technology specialism each term in Resistant Materials, Textiles and Food Prep and Nutrition.

Year 8 – Students experience a different Design Technology specialism each term in Graphic Communication, Textiles and Food Prep and Nutrition. Year 8 then make option choices in preparation for KS4 teaching to begin in Year 9

Key Stage 4

Year 9,10, 11 - Post option choices students will choose to study one of the following qualifications for three years at KS4:

  • AQA GCSE Design Technology
  • AQA Food Preparation and Nutrition
  • AQA Art and Design Graphic Communication
  • AQA Art and Design Textiles
  • EDQUAS Art and Design Product Design-3D

Key Stage 5

Year 12 and 13 - Following success at GCSE students can choose to study a 2 year linear A Level qualification in:

  • AQA Design Technology Product Design
  • AQA Fashion and Textiles

KS3 Food Preparation and Nutrition

Years 7 and 8 

All Key Stage Three students study the areas of graphics, resistant materials (including plastics), food and textiles. All projects follow the design process and culminate in the students making one of their designs. Our focus in KS3 is to develop practical skills which provide students with a better understanding of materials and processes when embarking on their designs. They are introduced to a range of design and making skills and are encouraged to critically evaluate their work and that of others.

Year 7

Students complete a basic skills course focusing on safety and hygiene, food choices in relation to healthy eating, two 'design and make' tasks focusing on a milk based drink or a smoothie and the 1 Star chef award to make a batch of muffins including fruit and vegetables.  Practical skills are delivered through the preparation of a range of dishes and using a range of equipment.

Year 8

Students study Food Preparation and nutrition for a term to extend their basic skills from Year 7 and to get a taster for the GCSE Food Preparation and nutrition course for choosing their options. Students follow a heavy practical skills based course to give them essential life skills post 16 and develop more complex skills to further their knowledge and skills of equipment and cooking techniques.

They follow a baking module at the start focusing on cakes, biscuits and pastry skills using a variety of equipment and ingredients.  They continue with a module based on salads and main meals in preparation for the 2 Star Chef award an independent practical skills assessment where they complete a design and make task to produce a healthy pizza or calzone to share with their friends. The final module focuses on main meals such as stir fry, curry, pasta dishes and fajitas culminating in the 3 Star Chef award their final design and make assessed practical task where they have to create at least two healthy dishes to be served at a celebration event or festival to reduce the fat, sugar and salt levels.

What skills students develop

Weighing and measuring, using equipment safely and hygienically, cooking a range of snacks, main meals, desserts, using a range of different ingredients and methods of cooking.

How students are assessed

Assessment takes place throughout all of the Key Stage 3 Food preparation and nutrition projects in the form of Tri Weekly and Key Assessments and work is not marked exclusively at the end. Books are expected to be kept organised and well presented at all times and these essential areas can affect the overall final level. The student’s level will also be based on; their ability to meet the requirements of a brief, their testing and trialling of recipes and skills and their final practical outcomes. By the end of Key Stage 3 this will include the 1 Star Chef award in Year 7 and in Year 8 a series of practical activities and the 2 Star and 3 Star chef awards.

Homework

A variety of homework tasks are set throughout the projects. On occasions these will be based on activities from the lesson to evaluate their products or dishes, or they may be an independent research task related to the course content or Chef Awards. If practical skills can be practised at home we thoroughly encourage it but we understand this is not always feasible.

How parents can help

All parents can help students with their Food preparation and nutrition work by providing basic ingredients and equipment that will allow them to present all of their work to a high standard. Another way in which a parent can support their child is by showing an interest in the subject and asking them what they have recently been cooking during their Food preparation and nutrition lessons. Ideally a parent will check over homework items and support them with their literacy skills.  I would encourage parents to support students by allowing them to weigh their own ingredients and prepare their equipment for practical lessons themselves so that they familiarise themselves with scales and ingredients and are prepared for the lesson.  Also to encourage them to help to make dinner or meals to practise their skills.

Extra-curricular Activities

A variety of after school activities regularly take place that help enthuse and support students who have an interest in Food and cooking whether they are currently studying it or not. After school sessions are held on Wednesday at Future chef cooking club and in extended day sessions.  On Wednesday our dedicated after school cooking club (Future Chef Club) takes place where students attend voluntarily to cook a range of seasonal dishes, compete in cooking competitions and generally enjoy cooking and trying out and testing new recipes.

Useful Food Links

KS3 Graphics

Year 8 Graphics

In year 8, young designers will learn how to visually communicate through a wide variety of media, technique and digital technology.

The Key Stage 3 schemes of work are designed to allow our students to experience how it feels to work like a designer in industry, using the most up to date Adobe Creative Suite software with teaching from a graphics specialism. Students work to a brief, just as they would in industry, which receives regular verbal and written feedback to enable our young designers to challenge themselves and make progress.

The work of artists & graphic designers are explored and our young designers learn to embrace work from the past, as well as current art practice.

Our focus in KS3 is to develop visual design skills, which provide students with a better understanding of graphic design. 

Through their education in 8, our young designers should be equipped with the knowledge to successfully progress onto GCSE Art & Design Graphic Communication should they wish to.

Year 8 students will be looking at marketing and advertising graphics for a children’s movie project of their choice. They will design and produce marketing/advertising material for a film company in the form of flyers, press advertising, cinema tickets, movie posters and a popcorn box to promote the new movie. It is important that they do not use existing images of previously released cinema productions. This will be their own work where they will also look at graphic and illustration artists as inspiration.

Students will develop their research and drawing skills and learn a range of graphic skills including: artist research, sketching, manipulating drawings, digital media such as adobe illustrator & understanding how to work with a range of graphic modelling materials.

What skills students develop

Hand skills, computer skills, accuracy, dimensioning, scale, presentation, manipulating images, colour awareness, promotion, packaging, nets, working with a variety of materials, sustainable design, meeting a brief, designing for a target market, planning, calculating, researching.

How students are assessed

Assessment takes place throughout all of the Key Stage 3 Graphics projects and work is not marked exclusively at the end. Students will sit a key assessment (test) and a tri-weekly assessment (project work/practical) during the projects. Folders are expected to be kept organised and well presented at all times and these essential areas can affect the overall final level. The student’s progress will also be based on; their ability to meet the requirements of a brief, their testing and trialling of materials and skills and their final practical outcome.

Homework

A variety of homework tasks are set throughout the projects. On occasions these will be based on activities from the lesson, or they may be an independent research task. If practical elements can be practised at home we thoroughly encourage it but we understand this is not always feasible.

How parents can help

All parents can help students with their Technology work by providing basic equipment that will allow them to present all of their work to a high standard. Another way in which a parent can support their child is by showing an interest in the subject and asking them what they have recently been completing during their Technology lessons. Ideally a parent will check over homework items and support them with their literature skills. Homework will always be added to Show my Homework too.

Extra-curricular Activities

A variety of after school activities regularly take place that help enthuse and support students who have an interest in Graphics whether they are currently studying it or not. After school session are held on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday and could be an extension of class based learning, an opportunity to complete homework or a completely new project. On occasions we have even had the students come up with ideas for Graphics based projects which we are able to facilitate.  

KS3 Resistant Materials

Year 7

During Year 7, students carry out a variety of Resistant Materials based tasks within the Pendant project.  At the beginning of the project they will research, design and create their own design made from of pewter. This is complimented by a piece of packaging they have created. To enable the manufacture of their jewellery, students will design the aesthetics of the proposed idea, from making a mould and cast to the packaging the product will be ‘sold’ in.

What skills students develop

A wide range of hand skills, computer skills, including CAD and layout, accuracy, dimensioning, presentation, manipulating images, colour awareness, promotion, advertising, working with a variety of materials, sustainable design, meeting a brief, designing for a target market, planning, calculating, researching, analysing, evaluating, group work, peer assessment and self-assessment.

How students are assessed

Assessment takes place throughout all of the Key Stage 3 in line with the school’s assessment and reporting. Books are expected to be kept organised and well presented at all times and the quality of this and students extended learning will affect the overall final level. The student’s level will also be based on; their ability to meet the requirements of a brief, their testing and trialling of materials and skills, their focus on practical tasks, folder work and their final practical outcome. By the end of Key Stage 3 this will include a piece of well finished jewellery and packaging in Year 7.

Homework

A variety of homework tasks are set throughout the projects. On occasions these will be based on activities from the lesson, or they may be an independent research task. If practical elements can be practised at home we thoroughly encourage it but we understand this is not always feasible.

How parents can help

All parents can help students with their Technology work by providing basic equipment that will allow them to present all of their work to a high standard. Another way in which a parent can support their child is by showing an interest in the subject and asking them what they have recently been completing during their Technology lessons. Ideally a parent will check over homework items and support them with their literature skills.

Extra-curricular Activities

A variety of after school activities regularly take place that help enthuse and support students who have an interest in Resistant Materials whether they are currently studying it or not. After school sessions are held weekly and could be an extension of class based learning, an opportunity to complete homework or a completely new project. On occasions we have even had the students come up with ideas for Resistant Materials based projects which we are able to facilitate.

KS3 Textiles

Years 7 and 8

Students develop an awareness and interest in the broad area of textiles. They are encouraged to explore and experiment with a wide range of techniques and equipment to develop skills and to express themselves creatively.

Year 7

Students learn basic skills, gathering a general knowledge of all equipment within the work room.  The project that student’s work on for one term,  is to design and make a patchwork cushion cover, which is decorated using sublimation printing and can be personalised individually via the use of components or CAD/CAM and reflect the theme of British Values.

Year 8

Students skills are developed further in Year 8 as they use more difficult fabrics to make a soft toy. This project extends their knowledge further and allows them to develop an understanding of the need for good research to help them plan, design and make their chosen toy safely, for a selected target market. It teaches them to construct a 3 dimensional product using shaping techniques.

What skills students develop

Students will learn a range of skills from understanding the need of thorough research, to being able to gather ideas to assist with their design work and then be able to make informed choices for their final design. They will learn basic pattern cutting and assembly, as well as lots of decorative skills, using a variety of equipment and machinery – sewing machines, over lockers, CAD and CAM etc., to make a product. They will also then learn how to test and improve their product by evaluating thoroughly.

How students are assessed

Continuous assessment is maintained throughout each project including self-assessment as students reflect on their own work and how it can be improved, peer assessment giving constructive comments to their colleagues. All work is reviewed and marked by the teacher at regular intervals, students will have two tri-weekly and two key assessments over the term and their final projects are summatively assessed at the end of each term.

Homework

Homework is set regularly in line with a weekly timetable, which helps build on their knowledge gained in school thus enabling students to extend their capabilities and experience as they complete their project work.

How parents can help

  • Parents can help students by monitoring their progress and evaluating their work with them.
  • Help students with their textiles work by providing basic equipment that will allow them to present all of their work to a high standard.
  • Another way in which a parent can support their child is by showing an interest in the subject and asking them what they have recently been completing during their textiles lessons.
  • Ideally a parent will check over homework items and support them with their literature skills.
  • On occasions a materials payment may be required and sometimes materials may need to be sourced independently.
  • If practical elements can be practised at home we thoroughly encourage it.

Extra-curricular Activities

  • In Textiles there is an after school club that runs regularly on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday evenings for all students that want to either continue with their coursework or maybe try some further skills or project.
  • Various clubs or workshops are planned throughout the year – In November there is a Christmas decoration making workshop offered to years 8 with a small charge for materials.

KS4 Food Preparation and Nutrition GCSE

GCSE Food Preparation and Nutrition AQA

A variety of practical cooking skills using a vast selection of ingredients and equipment.

  • GCSE - In Year 10 a series of modules to cover the syllabus requirements including Key Skills, Special Occasions, Salt and Health and Delicious Desserts.
  • GCSE - In Year 11 one project to research, design, produce and evaluate a chosen context given by the exam board.
  • What skills students develop
  • Food Technology is a practical subject which uses key cooking skills, knowledge of nutrition, ingredients, and understanding in developing new recipe ideas, planning using HACCP procedures, cooking recipes using higher level practical skills and finishing techniques, and evaluating the product, method of manufacture and individual performance.

Link to course specification

How students are assessed

  • Verbal feedback
  • Continuous assessment of class and homework
  • Self-assessment, peer assessment and evaluation
  • Tests and examinations
  • Controlled Assessment Coursework

Homework

A variety of homework tasks are set throughout the Food Technology courses.  Homework may relate to the theoretical elements of Food Technology which will prepare students for their examinations. It may consist of controlled assessment preparation. All set pieces of Food Technology coursework must be completed on time and to a high standard. Most controlled assessment coursework will be completed during lessons or under supervision at the end of the school day but additional work at home will enhance the overall grade and quality of work produced.

How parents can help

All parents can help students with their Food Technology work by providing ingredients and equipment that will allow them to present and cook all of their work to a high standard. Another way in which a parent can support their child is by showing an interest in the subject and asking them what they have recently been completing during their Food Technology lessons. Ideally a parent will check over homework items and support them with their literacy skills. 

If practical skills and recipes can be practised at home we thoroughly encourage it but we understand this is not always feasible.  I would encourage parents to support students by allowing them to weigh their own ingredients and prepare their own equipment for practical lessons themselves so that they familiarise themselves with scales and ingredients and are prepared for their lesson.  I would also encourage students to cook dinner at least once a week to practise their cooking skills, organisation and timing.

Extra-curricular Activities

A variety of after school activities regularly take place that help enthuse and support students who have an interest in Food Technology. After school sessions are held on Tuesdays and Thursdays and could be an extension of class based learning, an opportunity to complete homework or a current coursework project. The controlled assessment part of the course equates to 60% of the GCSE which means students will be required to attend after school sessions to enable them to prepare for their assessed pieces of work and practise possible recipe ideas in preparation for their assessed practical lessons.


Useful Links

KS4 Design Technology GCSE

Board and Exam Details

AQA Design Technology - One Route – All students study GCSE Design and Technology and at least one chosen specialist material area.

Link to course specification

Folder – 35%

Practical – 15%

Examination – 50%

The Course

Students will complete in depth theoretical study and practical exploration of…..

  • Core technical principles
  • Specialist technical principles
  • Designing and making principles

What skills students develop

Hand skills, computer skills, accuracy, dimensioning, scale, presentation, working with a variety of materials, sustainable design, meeting a brief, designing for a target market, planning, calculating, researching, ability to apply own research and testing to their practical outcomes, presenting work to others, critically assess their own and their peers designs.  Parallel to theory and research students complete a substantial design and make task focusing on the key skills

  • Investigating
  • Designing
  • Making
  • Analysing and Evaluating

How students are assessed

  • Verbal feedback
  • Continuous assessment of class and homework
  • Self-assessment, peer assessment and evaluation
  • Tests and examinations
  • Non exam Assessment (NEA)

Homework

A variety of homework’s are set throughout the course.  Homework may relate to the theoretical elements of Design Technology which will prepare students for their examinations. It may consist of controlled assessment preparation. All set pieces of NEA must be completed on time and to a high standard. Most NEA will be completed during lessons or under supervision at the end of the school day.

How parents can help

All parents can help students with their Design Technology work by providing basic equipment that will allow them to present all of their work to a high standard.  Another way in which a parent can support their child is by showing an interest in the subject and asking them what they have recently been completing during their Technology lessons. Ideally a parent will check over homework items and support them with their literature skills.  On occasions a materials payment may be required and sometimes materials may need to be sourced independently. If practical elements can be practised at home we thoroughly encourage it but we understand this is not always feasible.

Extra-curricular Activities

A variety of after school activities regularly take place that help enthuse and support students who have an interest In Design Technology. After school session are held weekly and could be an extension of class based learning, an opportunity to complete homework or a completely new project.  The NEA section of the course equates to 50% of the GCSE which means students will be required to attend after school sessions to enable them to prepare for their assessed pieces of work.

KS4 Art and Design Graphic Communication GCSE

Introduction

Graphics is intended for those candidates who are interested in an Art & Design course which relates to the appreciation of Graphic communication in advertising, illustration and in the promotion of ideas, information and new images.

The course will involve working to a design brief, identifying and exploring problems, planning courses of action, using appropriate equipment and materials, designing and working in a variety of media including computer graphics.

Students on the Graphic Communication GCSE course are introduced to a variety of experiences exploring a range of graphic media, techniques and processes, including both traditional and new technologies.

Board and Exam Details

AQA Art & Design Graphic Communication - One Route – All students study GCSE Graphic Communication.

Link to course specification

Along with a coursework/sketchbook submission, students are also required to complete a controlled test/examination, which is similar to a unit of work but produced in a limited time and concluded in 10 hours under exam conditions.

  • Sketchbooks/Portfolio – 60%
  • Examination – 40%

There are typically 2 coursework units and an exam unit, where students sit a 10-hour exam in which they produce their final outcome.  This takes place around Easter time of year 11. The examining body for the course is AQA, which is also used for GCSE Art, therefor assessed on the same criteria.

The Course

Students will complete in depth study and practical exploration of:

  • Advertising
  • Illustration
  • Computer aided design
  • Packaging
  • Typography

From this experience students can select one or more areas to develop as they produce the range of work needed to fulfil this subject’s GCSE requirements.

All students have access to the most up to date Adobe Software Collection, which is in line with industry standard. Students cover areas of study within Photoshop, Illustrator, Digital Photography, Typography, Illustration, Layout/Design for Print, Animation, Print Making, Advertising and Packaging Design.

Personal Attributes students should have?

  • Show a high level of commitment, both in school and on visits to external facilities and in completion of work out of school hours.
  • Provide themselves with basic equipment e.g. glue stick, colouring pencils, pencils, ruler, rubber, crayons, scissors etc.
  • To visit art galleries, libraries, museums and other places relevant to the course (either independently or through school trips)
  • Consider their own suitability for a course, which relies heavily on self-discipline in a practical area.

What skills students develop?

Hand skills, computer skills, accuracy, dimensioning, scale, presentation, working with a variety of materials, sustainable design, meeting a brief, designing for a target market, planning, calculating, researching, ability to apply own research and testing to their practical outcomes, presenting work to others, critically assess their own and their peers designs. Parallel to theory and research students complete a substantial design and make task focusing on the key skills:

  • Investigating
  • Designing
  • Making
  • Analysing and Evaluating

How students are assessed?

  • Verbal feedback
  • Continuous assessment of classwork and homework
  • Self-assessment, peer assessment and evaluation
  • Tests and examinations incorporating key assessments and tri-weekly assessments
  • Non exam Assessment (NEA)

Homework

Students will be expected to complete a range of independent research tasks, personal preparation and gather material for use in their own work on a weekly basis.

Homework may relate to the theoretical elements of Design Technology, which will prepare students for their examinations and further study. It may consist of controlled assessment preparation. All set pieces of NEA must be completed on time and to a high standard. Most NEA will be completed during lessons or under supervision at the end of the school day.

How parents can help

All parents can help students with their Design Technology work by providing basic equipment that will allow them to present all of their work to a high standard.  Another way in which a parent can support their child is by showing an interest in the subject and asking them what they have recently been completing during their Technology lessons. Ideally a parent will check over homework items and support them with their literature skills. On occasions a materials payment may be required and sometimes materials may need to be sourced independently. If practical elements can be practised at home we thoroughly encourage it but we understand this is not always feasible.

Extra-curricular activities

A variety of after school activities regularly take place that help enthuse and support students who have an interest in Design & Technology. 

The NEA section of the course equates to 60% of the GCSE, which means students will be required to attend after school sessions to enable them to prepare for their assessed pieces of work.

Further Education / Future Careers

Students completing the Art & Design Graphics course will gain the necessary skills to continue their artistic development at further or higher education level. The course offers a broad skills base including design, creative ICT applications Photoshop, Illustrator and use of mixed media, which equips students to go on to Graphics courses as well as Design courses .

Careers in the creative industries are varied and students will discover opportunities as they continue their route through further education courses.

GCSE itself develops creativity and practical skills which are relevant and transferable to many areas of work or apprenticeships.

KS4 Art and Design - Textiles

Course detail

The course has been designed to allow students to develop knowledge and understanding, through a variety of learning experiences and approaches, including engagement with sources. This will allow you to develop the skills to explore, create and communicate your own ideas.

You will demonstrate these skills through the development, refinement, recording, realisation and presentation of ideas through a portfolio and by responding to an externally set assignment which is 10 hours under exam conditions.

·         Coursework Folder – 60%

·         Examination – 40%

The examining body for the course is AQA, which is also used for GCSE Fine Art and Art Graphics and is therefore assessed on the same criteria. Further details for assessment and advice can be found on AQA’s website here: https://www.aqa.org.uk/subjects/art-and-design/gcse/art-and-design-8201-8206/specification-at-a-glance

 

In Component 1 and Component 2 students are required to work in one or more area(s) of design textile, such as those listed below:

  • art textiles
  • fashion design and illustration
  • costume design
  • constructed textiles
  • printed and dyed textiles
  • surface pattern
  • stitched and/or embellished textiles
  • soft furnishings and/or textiles for interiors
  • digital textiles
  • installed textiles

Assessment

The exams and non-exam assessment will measure how students have achieved the following assessment objectives or AO’S.  There are 4 main marking objectives:

  • AO1: Develop ideas through investigations, demonstrating critical understanding of sources.

An ability to effectively develop ideas through creative and purposeful investigations. An exceptional ability to engage with and demonstrate critical understanding of sources.

RESEARCH THE WORK OF OTHERS AND USE AS INFLUENCE WITHIN THEIR OWN WORK.

  • AO2: Refine work by exploring ideas, selecting and experimenting with appropriate media, materials, techniques and processes.

An ability to thoughtfully refine ideas with discrimination. An ability to effectively select and purposefully experiment with appropriate media, materials, techniques and processes.

USING PAINTS,CRAYONS,PASTELS,CAD,PHOTOSHOP,PHOTOGRAPHY TO PRESENT DESIGN IDEAS

  • AO3: Record ideas, observations and insights relevant to intentions as work progresses.

An ability to skillfully and rigorously record ideas, observations and insights through drawing and annotation, and any other appropriate means relevant to intentions, as work progresses.

CREATING SKETCHBOOKS AND DESIGN SHEETS RELEVANT TO THEIR CHOSEN THEME

  • AO4: Present a personal and meaningful response that realises intentions and demonstrates understanding of visual language.

An ability to competently present a personal and meaningful response and realise intentions with confidence and conviction. An exceptional ability to demonstrate understanding of visual language.

RESPONDING TO A DESIGN BRIEF CREATIVELY

Extended day

An extended day session runs Wednesdays for year 11 students to support them with their portfolio development. It is expected that students attended this weekly session to receive the support and advice needed.

What type of students are suited to this GCSE?

  • Highly creative, willing to take design risks and develop an experimental approach.
  • Self-disciplined, driven and highly organised in order to complete the required amount of work as 60% is based on coursework (NEA).
  • Willing to draw and experiment with different drawing techniques and be critical of their own work.
  • Shows an interest in fashion, art, culture and design. Students who visit museums, galleries and other exhibitions and/or read books/magazines related to the course in their own time or through school will find this will broaden their understanding of the world of design and inspire them.
  • Excellent presentation skills and takes pride in the quality of their work.

 

Further Education and Career opportunities:

This course enables students to go onto further study at A-Level and university as it develops a broad range of manufacturing and illustrative skills, opportunities for creative and critical thinking, evaluation and experimentation as well as exploring the cultural, historical and social influences of art on design.

Careers from this course include but are not limited to: fashion design, costume design, pattern cutting, print design, tailoring/alterations, fashion journalism, fashion photography, fashion illustration, garment technologist and more…

KS4 Art and Design - Product Design 3D

Course

WJEC Eduqas GCSE in Art and Design - Product Design 3D

Link to course specification

Course Summary

This course is designed to provide engaging, challenging, coherent and meaningful learning experiences through a flexible structure that supports the sequential and incremental development of creative practice. Our rewarding and immersive programme of study broadens experience, develops imagination and technical skills, fosters creativity and promotes personal and social development. The focus of the specification is to nurture an enthusiasm for Art, Craft and Design and, through a broad introductory foundation programme, to develop critical, practical and theoretical skills that enable students to gain a holistic understanding of a range of practices and contexts in the visual arts, crafts and design fields.

Course details

Course Focus: Three Dimensional Design – Product Design

Three-Dimensional Design is defined here as the design, prototyping, modelling or making of primarily functional and aesthetic consumer products, objects, and environments. This might include site-specific sculptural forms made to meet a design brief.

Students undertaking this title must explore practical and relevant critical and contextual sources such as the work of historical and contemporary three-dimensional designers and makers, as well as the different purposes, intentions and functions of three-dimensional design as appropriate to their own work. Students should demonstrate the ability to work creatively with processes, techniques and materials, including those that are recyclable, appropriate to the chosen area of study such as: computer-aided design; model making; prototyping; constructing and assembling. An understanding of the relationship between form and function is essential.

Assessment

Component 1: Portfolio

60% of qualification: 120 marks

This component comprises a major practical portfolio and outcome/s to be based on Internally set themes and subject matter developed from personal and/or given starting points. This component will be internally set, internally assessed and externally moderated. Work will be selected, evaluated and presented for assessment by the student. Evidence is required of how the student have met each of the assessment objectives. No time limit: duration to be determined by the school.

Component 2: Externally Set Assignment

40% of qualification: 80 marks

The Externally Set Assignment consists of two parts:

Part 1: Preparatory study period

Externally Set Assignment materials set by WJEC are released to the students 2 January (in the calendar year in which the assessment is to be taken) andwill consist of assignments based on themes, visual stimuli and written briefs, which are tobe presented to the student at the start of the preparatory study period.

One of the assignments is to be selected by the student and used as a starting point from which to elicit a personal, creative response. Responses are developed during the preparatory study period. They should take the form of practical, critical and contextual preparatory work/supporting studies which inform the resolution of the student’s ideas in the 10 hours sustained focus study.

Part 2: 10 hour period of sustained focus work

The result of the student’s ideas from the preparatory work must be completed during the designated 10 hours of sustained focus work. The period of sustained focus work must be completed under supervised conditions. Work will be selected, evaluated and presented for assessment by the student. The Externally Set Assignment will be set by WJEC, assessed by the teacher and externally moderated.

Both the preparatory work and sustained focus work will be assessed together using the assessment objectives.

Assessment Objectives

As part of their studies for Three-dimensional design students should aim to present clear evidence of addressing the assessment objectives (AO), as in the following examples.

AO1

Develop ideas that are informed by investigative, contextual and cultural studies of historical and contemporary three-dimensional design in their own and other societies and other sources, for example, in the work of craftspeople working in wood or metal.

Explore a wide variety of work produced by three-dimensional designers and understand the differences in their methods, approaches, purposes and intentions such as ethical considerations.

Provide evidence of analytical skills and critical and contextual understanding by appraising, comparing and contrasting the work of relevant three-dimensional designers and other historical and contextual sources, using this to inform their own work.

Increase awareness of the wide variety of three-dimensional design processes and outcomes and the differences between these, including relationships between functional and aesthetic considerations and how these are applied and adapted to meet particular needs.

AO2

Refine and reflect upon work as it progresses by exploring ideas, selecting and experimenting with appropriate breadth of three-dimensional design materials and processes, including, wood, clay, plastic, metal, card and paper and, where appropriate, the purposeful manipulation of digital software. Exercise skilful and safe application of these to maximise creative potential and produce quality outcomes.

Explore a stimulating and rich variety of resources to initiate and develop innovative ideas. 

Pay due regard to line, tone, colour, shape, texture and other visual elements and where appropriate, use drawing to explore and communicate ideas.

Provide evidence of appropriate depth and breadth of study of three-dimensional design.

Employ sensitive control, for example in refining detail, aspects of functionality, and ergonomic and aesthetic considerations.

Show discrimination in reviewing ideas as work develops. Establish a clear working relationship between working methods and outcomes by documenting significant steps so that final outcomes do not emerge without evidence of the creative process.

AO3

Gather, select, organise and communicate information that is relevant to their personal interests as a consequence of careful research and analysis of a stimulating and rich variety of resources.

Record ideas, first-hand observations, insights and judgments by any suitable means, such as sketches, diagrams, technical drawings and written notes that are relevant to personal intentions.

Critically reflect on work as it progresses in order to review what has been learned, acquire deeper understanding and clarify purposes and meanings.

AO4

Present personal, imaginative final outcomes, together with selective evidence of thinking and production processes, that effectively realise the student’s stated intentions or a design brief and demonstrate critical understanding of visual and, where appropriate, other forms of communication. For example, producing designs and a model of play equipment for a children’s playground in a local park or open space.

Make explicit connections, where appropriate, between the different elements of the submission, including contextual, practical and written responses, presenting work that is meaningful, well-informed and in a sequence that can be easily followed and results in quality outcomes.

Consider different presentational formats and select the most appropriate for the submission.

Due regard should be given to the purpose of the work and how it might engage the interest of an audience or potential clients. For example, students could make a scale model of a film or theatre set or a one-off piece of jewellery.

How parents can help

All parents can help students with their Art and Design work by providing basic equipment that will allow them to present all of their work to a high standard.  Another way in which a parent can support their child is by showing an interest in the subject and asking them what they have recently been completing during their lessons. Ideally a parent will check over homework items and support them with their literature skills.  On occasions a materials payment may be required and sometimes materials may need to be sourced independently. If practical elements can be practised at home we thoroughly encourage it but we understand this is not always feasible.

Extra-curricular Activities

A variety of after school activities regularly take place that help enthuse and support students who have an interest In Design Technology. After school session are held weekly and could be an extension of class based learning, an opportunity to complete homework or a completely new project.  The demands of the sketchbooks and practical work means students will be required to attend after school sessions to enable them to prepare for their assessed pieces of work.

Bronze School Mental Health Award